181 not a reference

Young Muslims On Trial

Additional information
Introduction: 

A new report by Maslaha, funded by Barrow Cadbury, exploring the impact of Islamophobia on criminal justice decision-making and young Muslims

Blog Introduction: 

A new report by Maslaha, funded by Barrow Cadbury, exploring the impact of Islamophobia on criminal justice decision-making and young Muslims

Supporter Introduction: 

The report was funded by Barrow Cadbury Trust as part of the work of its Transition to Adulthood (T2A) programme and the Young Review

Maslaha’s report ‘Young Muslims on Trial – the impact of Islamophobia on criminal justice decision-making’ published in March 2016, challenges the criminal justice system’s negative view of Islam. 

You can download a copy of the report here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The report was funded by Barrow Cadbury Trust as part of the work of its Transition to Adulthood (T2A) programme and the Young Review.  The Young Review, published in December 2014, identified an over-representation and a disparity in both treatment and outcome for young African, Caribbean, mixed origin and Muslim men at every stage of the criminal justice process. The report described the treatment of Muslim prisoners as being the result of “at best a lack of cultural competence and at worst prejudice and racist stereotyping.”

In support of recommendations from The Young Review that a range of practical and powerful tools be developed for future providers to intervene early and reverse this disproportionality, Barrow Cadbury commissioned Maslaha to undergo a scoping exercise to ascertain how criminal justice professionals can be more effective in responding to offending by young Muslim men who come into contact with the criminal justice system (CJS.)

Although there has been positive change in policy and practice in recent years in relation to young adults, which includes ‘lack of maturity’ being considered a mitigating factor in prosecution and sentencing decisions, the growing disproportionality of young BAME men in the system, has raised the question of whether other factors might need to be taken into account. 

During the course of this scoping exercise we interviewed individuals at a range of bodies and agencies including representatives and employees of: 

  • Probation services 
  • The Law Society 
  • Criminologists 
  • Regional police forces 
  • Police and Crime Commissioners (PCC)
  • Voluntary sector organisations and projects working with young black and/or Muslim men in the CJS. 
  • Discussion groups in London and Leicester with young Muslims who have experience of the criminal justice system. 

This report summarises themes emerging in the interviews, followed by a series of recommendations proposing interventions which we believe could lead to criminal justice professionals having a broader understanding of a young Muslim’s life. 

This could have the potential to deliver more appropriate strategies for responding to offending by young Muslims, in the same way that considering maturity as a mitigating factor improves effectiveness in relation to young adults generally. 

Listing Information
List Image: 
Teaser: 

A new report by Maslaha, funded by Barrow Cadbury, exploring the impact of Islamophobia on criminal justice decision-making and young Muslims

A new report by Maslaha, funded by Barrow Cadbury, exploring the impact of Islamophobia on criminal justice decision-making and young Muslims

A new report by Maslaha, funded by Barrow Cadbury, exploring the impact of Islamophobia on criminal justice decision-making and young Muslims

The report was funded by Barrow Cadbury Trust as part of the work of its Transition to Adulthood (T2A) programme and the Young Review