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Facts & statistics

Project: 

Facts on domestic abuse and young people’s attitudes towards violence

This factsheet provides background information on key studies and statistics from the UK, and can be used by teachers to help introduce a lesson or unit on domestic violence, or by students to facilitate research.

It can be downloaded as part of the teacher guide

 

Domestic violence in the UK

Every minute in the UK, the police receive a call from the public for assistance for domestic violence. This leads to police receiving an estimated 1,300 calls each day or over 570,000 each year (Stanko, 2000). However, according to the British Crime Survey, only 40.2% of actual domestic violence crime is reported to the police (Dodd et al, July 2004).

Source: Women’s Aid website referring to E. Stanko (“The day to count: A snapshot of the impact of domestic violence in the UK” Criminal Justice 1:2) & T. Dodd (Crime in England and Wales 2003-4 Home Office Statistical Bulletin 10/04)

 

On average, two women a week are killed by a violent partner or ex-partner. This constitutes nearly 40% of all female homicide victims. 

Source: Women’s Aid website, referring to T. Dodd (Crime in England and Wales 2003-4 Home Office Statistical Bulletin 10/04)

 

An analysis of ten separate domestic violence prevalence studies by the Council of Europe showed consistent findings: 1 in 4 women experience domestic violence during their lifetime and between 6 - 10% of women experience domestic violence in any given year.

Source: AVA Project website, referring to the Council of Europe (Recommendation 2002/5 of the Committee of Ministers to Member States on the Protection of Women Against Violence adopted on 30 April 2002)

 

100,000 children run away from home every year in the UK. Four out of five children who run away from home say they do so to escape family conflict, violence or abuse.

Source: AVA Project website, referring to The Children’s Society 1999

 

At least 750,000 children a year witness domestic violence. Nearly three quarters of children on the ‘at risk’ register live in household where domestic violence occurs.

Source: AVA Project website, referring to the Department of Health 2002

 

 

Young people

1 in 2 boys & 1 in 3 girls think there are some circumstances when it is ok to hit a woman or force her to have sex.

Source: One Billion Rising UK website, referring to a Zero Tolerance report 1998 (‘Young people’s attitudes towards violence, sex and relationships’)

 

One survey showed that one in five teenage girls has been hit by a boyfriend, one third of teenage girls say that cheating justifies violence, and over 40% of all girls said they would consider giving a boy a second chance if he hit them.

Source: AVA Project website, referring to an NSPCC/Sugar survey 2005

 

Almost half (43%) of teenage girls believe that it is acceptable for a boyfriend to be aggressive towards his partner.

Source: One Billion Rising UK website, referring to an NSPCC/Sugar survey 2005

 

Out of 1,353 young people aged between 13 and 17 surveyed by the NSPCC in 2009, a third of girls who were in relationships had experienced unwanted sexual acts, and one in 16 had been raped.

Source: One Billion Rising UK website, referring to an NSPCC/University of Bristol report 2009 (‘Partner exploitation and violence in teenage intimate relationships’)

 

A YouGov survey of 1,400 14-17 year olds in the UK found that 27% of boys access pornography every week. 1 in 5 young people had been sent pornography via email or a mobile phone without their consent.

Source: AVA Project website, referring to a YouGov survey 2008

 

77% of young people do not feel they have enough information and support to deal with physical or sexual violence.

Source: One Billion Rising UK website, referring to an ICM poll 2006

 

 

Schools & colleges

One in three 16-18 year-old girls have experienced unwanted sexual touching at school in the UK.

Source: One Billion Rising UK website, referring to a YouGov poll 2010

 

28% of young people report they had seen sexual pictures on mobile phones at school a few times a month or more.

Source: One Billion Rising UK website, referring to a YouGov poll 2010

 

With primary prevention work to stop domestic violence from happening in the first place being described as: ‘the weakest part of the UK responses to violence against women’ (Coy et al. 2008), and evidence suggesting that the deeply rooted attitudes that tolerate domestic violence continue to be held, it is generally agreed that schools are the ideal place to change these attitudes.

Source: ‘Starting in Schools’ report by Refuge, referring to M. Coy (‘Realising Rights, Fulfilling Obligations: A Template for an Integrated Strategy on Violence Against Women in the UK,’ EVAW)

 

 

Forced marriage (FM)

In 2011 there were 1468 instances where the Forced Marriage Unit (FMU) gave advice or support related to a possible forced marriage. 78% of these concerned females and 22% males.

Source: Forced Marriage Unit (FMU) website

 

Based on the data on the number of FM cases (either actual FM or the threat of FM) encountered by local organisations and the key national organisations, the national prevalence of reported cases of FM in England is estimated to be between 5,000 and 8,000. This estimate does not include a potentially large number of victims who have not come of the attention of any agencies or professionals, since a large general population survey would be required to estimate the prevalence of these ‘hidden’ victims.

Source: ‘Forced Marriage: Prevalence & Service Response’ report by the National Centre for Social Research (NSRC) 2009

 

Whilst FM is not exclusively an issue for Asian communities, 97% of those seeking help or advice relating to FM from local organisations were identified as Asian.

Source: ‘Forced Marriage: Prevalence & Service Response’ report by the National Centre for Social Research (NSRC) 2009

 

Within local organisations, 41% of reported cases concerned victims under the age of 18.

Source: ‘Forced Marriage: Prevalence & Service Response’ report by the National Centre for Social Research (NSRC) 2009

 

 

Honour-based violence

There are at least 12 honour killings per year in the UK.

Source: Rosie Cowan in the Guardian newspaper 2004, referring to human rights groups’ statistics

 

In 2004, the Metropolitan Police decided to re-open 114 murder cases from the previous decade, which they now think may be so-called 'honour' killings.

Source: AVA Project website, referring to a Met Police report 2004

 

Up to 17,000 women in Britain are being subjected to "honour" related violence, including murder, every year, according to police chiefs.

Source: Independent newspaper, referring to Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) 2008

 

The Iranian and Kurdish Women's Rights Organisation (IKWRO), has recently carried out a survey of police forces statistics, which found there are 2,823 "honour" crimes a year. That's nearly eight a day.

Source: BBC Panorama - Britain’s Crimes of Honour 2012

 

Black and Asian women are considerably more at risk of attempting suicide, with prevalence ratios 1.6 times that of white women and 2.5 times that of Asian men. Young Asian women (under 30) are 2.5 times more likely to attempt suicide than white women and seven times more likely than Asian men.

Source: ‘Asian Women, Domestic Violence & Mental Health’ report by Government Office 2009, referring to various studies 1986-2007

 

 

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM)

66,000 women in the UK have had their genitals mutilated.

Source: ‘A Statistical Study to Estimate the Prevalence of FGM in England and Wales’ report by FORWARD/Department of Health 2007

 

Research suggests that over 20,000 girls in England and Wales under the age of 15 are at risk of FGM.

Source: ‘A Statistical Study to Estimate the Prevalence of FGM in England and Wales’ report by FORWARD/Department of Health 2007

 

There have been no convictions for FGM since it was outlawed in 1985 in the U.K, compared to 100 in France.

Source: AVA Project website, referring to a Parliamentary question in 2000, Hansard

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