Education

Radical Whispers - Afghan Women's Poetry

A collaboration with Poet in the City and Amnesty exploring the power of dissent through Afghan women's poetry.

Escuela Nueva in the UK

Adapting the award-winning Escuela Nueva whole school education model to the UK

Read the latest news about the project here...

Our team and partners

Nusrat Faizullah

Nusrat Faizullah has spent over 10 years working in education developing new approaches to tackle educational disadvantage. This included leading the development of an innovative curriculum model for Studio Schools, a new type of school for 14 – 19 year olds, which rooted learning in the real world. 

Fundación Escuela Nueva (FEN)

FEN is a Columbian NGO founded in 1987 by the creators of the Escuela Nueva pedagogical model. Since this time 5 million children have benefited from FEN’s educational approach. This success has been recognised by organisations such as the World Bank, UN, Ashoka, WISE and Skoll. Vicky Colbert the director of FEN was honoured as the 2013 WISE Prize for Education Laureate. 

Co-operative Schools

There are over 850 schools that now are a part of the Co-operative movement spread across the country with more schools joining every week. These schools all share the same values and principles which support them to develop a Co-operative identity.

School workshops: social entrepreneurship

Coming soon!

No entries yet... stay tuned!

We have worked with partner schools/groups from:

  • Lewisham
  • Southwark
  • Tower Hamlets
  • Waltham Forest
  • Westminster
  • Paris, France
  • Muscat, Oman
  • Seoul, South Korea

School workshops: gender equality & identity

Coming soon!

No entries yet... stay tuned! 

We have worked with partner schools/groups from:

  • Camden
  • Lewisham
  • Southwark
  • Tower Hamlets
  • Waltham Forest
  • Westminster
  • Norwich
  • Paris, France
  • Muscat, Oman
  • Seoul, South Korea

 

'Meet the Somalis' comics in schools

Somali pupils in the UK are currently one of the lowest performing groups in terms of educational attainment – in 2007, 24% achieved 5 GCSEs at grades A*-C.[1] Despite the fact that Somali pupils and their parents have been shown to have high aspirations and a positive attitude to schooling, educational attainment is variable and as an overall group remains low,[2] although there is significant local variation. 

There is also a disproportionate number of Somali pupils at risk of being excluded from schools.[3] There is further background research here

However, as statistics only ever tell a small part of the story, we worked in partnership with William Ellis School in North London to explore and share the bigger picture, working both with young people of Somali origin and young people of other backgrounds. The variety of perspectives give a deeper and richer understanding of the experiences of Somali-heritage young people. While this specific context is the focus, many of the issues and experiences will be familiar to and relevant for other young people from all walks of life. 

The results are the multimedia resource pages, here

 

Notes

[1] Strand et al (2010) Drivers and Challenges in Raising the Achievement of Pupils from Bangladeshi, Somali and Turkish Backgrounds, DCSF p27; Greater London Authority (2013) The London Annual Education Report, p16

[2] ibid p14-17

[3] Jill Rutter (2004) Refugee Communities in the UK: Somali Children’s Educational Progress and Life Experiences, London Metropolitan University p4

 

This project is supported and funded by Open Society Foundations.

Our partners include:

Islam and feminism

The resource was created by Maslaha for anybody with an interest in exploring the breadth of ideas associated with feminism and Islam. It can be used as a research tool or as a practical tool to inspire and equip with current thought. 

Specifically, it can be used in schools (Key Stage 3 upwards) and colleges, and other educational settings, as a means to explore a variety of topics. There are a range of articles, profiles, and films which give the reader an introduction to the subject. There is historical content and theory, as well as personal accounts from Muslim women.

The resource can therefore be used in schools and educational settings as a way of exploring Women’s History Month. It can also be useful for PSHE, RE, Politics and Sociology - the short films can function as lesson starters. 

The latest blog posts around Islam and feminism...

Education resources

Maslaha and Education

Inequalities still persist for young Muslims being educated in the UK today. In 2009, 38 per cent of Pakistani and Bangladeshi children attained a good level of development at the Foundation Stage Profile – 12 percentage points lower than the national average. At GCSE level, 43 per cent of Pakistani students achieved five or more GCSEs graded A*-C, compared with 51 per cent of White British students, and 72 per cent of Chinese students.

Evidence suggests that this disparity is liked specifically to religion, not just to ethnicity. Within ethnic groups, the attainment gap between Muslim and non-Muslim students persists. The National Equality Panel report, An Anatomy of Economic Inequality in the UK, noted that Indian Hindu and Sikh girls achieved on average one more GCSE graded A*-C than Indian Muslim girls, and two more than Pakistani Muslim girls.

Of those who leave school at age 16, Bangladeshi and Pakistani young people are half as likely to participate in adult learning as their White counterparts (29 per cent and 34 per cent, compared to 63 per cent). Young Muslims are more likely to be not in employment, education or training (NEET) by age 19-21 than Christian young people (28 per cent, compared to an average of 23 per cent). By age 22-24, 42 per cent of all those who are NEET are Muslim.

This evidence strongly suggests that the British education systems could do much more to engage with Muslim pupils.

Syndicate content